RFG_2017_11x17_2.jpg
dscn2346.jpg
1024px-NGC7293_(2004).jpg
27368590361_72064d8dd7_o.jpg
RFG_2017_11x17_2.jpg

Header


REASON FOR GOD

Discussing objections and questions about God

 

Tuesday and Thursday nights during IAP

January 16 - February 1, 2018 | 6:30PM - 8:00PM  

3rd Floor Mezzanine, Student Center, MIT

Free dinner provided

SCROLL DOWN

Header


REASON FOR GOD

Discussing objections and questions about God

 

Tuesday and Thursday nights during IAP

January 16 - February 1, 2018 | 6:30PM - 8:00PM  

3rd Floor Mezzanine, Student Center, MIT

Free dinner provided

Whether you consider yourself a believer or a skeptic, I invite you to seek the same kind of honesty and to grow in an understanding of the nature of your own doubts. The result will exceed anything you can imagine.” 

― Timothy J. Keller, The Reason for God: Belief in an Age of Skepticism

dscn2346.jpg

Energy/About


Energy/About


JOIN US EVERY TUESDAY AND THURSDAY NIGHT DURING IAP TO ADDRESS QUESTIONS AND OBJECTIONS TO BELIEF IN GOD AND CHRISTIANITY

Reason for God is for anyone (the religious, the spiritual, the skeptic, the seeker, atheists, Christians and people of any faith tradition).  

Our hope is that each session will be a safe place to explore, ask questions, disagree, and learn.  You may have questions or objections that aren't represented in the topics below, but feel free to ask about them.

Each night we will gather together to eat and analyze some of the big questions and objections that people have when it comes to the existence of God and belief in Christianity.  

This series has been going on for the past four years at MIT and it has been very well received and attended.

We hope you will join us for one or more sessions this year.  


WHAT TO EXPECT EACH NIGHT

Things kick off at 6:30pm with a FREE catered dinner. Once everyone has their food, we'll transition to our speaker for the night, followed by a Question and Answer time. We wrap up at 8:00pm, but feel free to hang out afterwards and continue talking. We'll have desserts and your choice of hot beverages.

1024px-NGC7293_(2004).jpg

Cosmos/Events


TOPICS

Cosmos/Events


TOPICS

All events are held in the Mezzanine Lounge on the 3rd floor of the MIT Student Center at 6:30pm.

If you can't make it to a session, don't worry. We'll post the audio from each talk on this page. Check back here regularly to listen.

TUESDAY
JANUARY 16, 2018

Do We Need God To Know Ourselves? Is God Actually Relevant to Real Life?
KASEY LEANDER - OXFORD CENTER FOR CHRISTIAN APOLOGETICS FELLOW

Human beings possess an incredible array of meaningful characteristics. We seem to exist as individual selves capable of relationships, art, language, creativity and beauty. How can we best explain these phenomena? Are we capable of self-definition? Do our experiences, relationships, failures and aspirations mean anything?  Is God needed to understand who we are?  Do we need God, something external to the human experience, to truly know ourselves? 

 

THURSDAY
JANUARY 18, 2018

If God Is All-Loving And All-Powerful, Why
Do Evil And Suffering Exist?

MATTHEW MITTELBERG - OXFORD CENTER FOR CHRISTIAN APOLOGETICS FELLOW

 

Our world is a place of beauty and love—but also of pain, suffering, and death. If there is an all-powerful God who could change things, and if he’s an all-loving being who would want to do so, why doesn’t he stop evil? If God exists, wouldn’t he create a perfect world where everyone was happy? Does this issue expose a logical contradiction in the Christian faith? Or might there be a way to reconcile the existence of suffering with the reality of God?

 

TUESDAY
JANUARY 23, 2018

Do We Need God To Make Moral Judgments? Do We Need God To Be Good?
KASEY LEANDER - OXFORD CENTER FOR CHRISTIAN APOLOGETICS FELLOW

Our world is filled with complex moral challenges. What best explains our experiences of morality? Are our moral intuitions reducible to a set of evolutionary processes? Can genuine moral reasoning exist without God?

 

THURSDAY
JANUARY 25, 2018

What Is Faith and Does Science Need It? Has Science Eliminated Our Need For God?
DR. IAN HUTCHINSON - PROFESSOR OF NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING AT MIT

What is faith? Isn't blind faith the problem and critical thinking the solution?  Isn't there a difference between accepting expertise and bowing to authority? Is a faith-based view a liability in science? What is the relationship between faith and science?

 

TUESDAY
JANUARY 30, 2018

Do The Laws Of Nature Point To God? Could There Be Evidence For God In The Universe?
TOM RUDELIUS - POSTDOCTORAL RESEARCHER, INSTITUTE FOR ADVANCED STUDIES

The fundamental laws of nature in our universe appear to be "fine-tuned" to allow for intelligent life.  In this talk, we'll explore possible explanations for this phenomenon and speculate on the possible role of a designer.

THURSDAY
FEBRUARY 1, 2018

Arrogance & Exclusivity: Can There Be Just One Way To God?
MATTHEW MITTELBERG - OXFORD CENTER FOR CHRISTIAN APOLOGETICS FELLOW

All roads lead to Rome. Do many paths lead to God? If so, why do Christians claim that Jesus is the only way? Is it narrow-minded for Christians to claim they have the truth, and every other worldview is wrong? What do other religions have to say about truth? Do we all have our own truth that we need to follow to find God? 

27368590361_72064d8dd7_o.jpg

Organisms/Speakers


SPEAKERS

Organisms/Speakers


SPEAKERS

DR. IAN HUTCHINSON

Dr. Ian Hutchinson - a plasma physicist and Professor of Nuclear Science and Engineering at MIT. He and his research group are international pioneers exploring the generation and confinement of plasmas hotter than the sun's center; experimenting on a world-leading magnetic confinement device they designed and built. The research aims to understand how to produce practical energy from controlled nuclear fusion reactions, the power source of the stars.  
http://www-internal.psfc.mit.edu/~hutch/

 

KASEY LEANDER

unnamed (4).jpg

Kasey Leander is a Fellow with the Oxford Centre for Christian Apologetics (OCCA). Prior to his time at OCCA, Kasey earned an undergraduate degree in history and PPE (Politics, Philosophy, and Economics) from Taylor University. While at Taylor, Kasey served in various leadership roles on campus and was active in student government. He has also worked briefly in politics, serving as an intern in the US Senate in Washington, DC.

A love of discussing the big questions of life has led Kasey to his current job. As an OCCA Fellow, he enjoys speaking on topics such as the need for God in moral reasoning, the philosophical underpinnings of popular culture, and the historical basis of the Christian message. In a world of increasing ideological divergence, Kasey’s great joy has been exploring the peace, truth, and clarity of the gospel of Jesus Christ.

Kasey originally hails from Colorado Springs, Colorado, and is a huge fan of hiking, Chipotle, good books, and ultimate frisbee.

 

MATTHEW MITTELBERG

Matthew-Mittelburg-web-bio.jpg

Matthew Mittelberg

Matthew Mittelberg is a Fellow with the Oxford Centre for Christian Apologetics (OCCA). He earned a bachelor’s degree in Entrepreneurial Business from Grand Canyon University in Phoenix, AZ. Matthew also received his Certificate of Theological Studies at Wycliffe Hall, Oxford University.

He has spent an extensive amount of time studying the philosophical underpinnings of various worldviews. Matthew loves thinking about the intersection of faith and reason, and how these topics affect the deepest questions of life. He has spoken at colleges, churches, societies, and training events and is passionate about helping everyday people understand that faith in God can actually make sense.

Matthew also enjoys spending time with friends, playing Ultimate Frisbee, and eating authentic Japanese ramen. 

 

TOM RUDELIUS

37465.jpeg

Tom Rudelius is a postdoctoral researcher at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, NJ. His research focuses on string theory, early universe cosmology, and the relationship between the two. He holds a Ph.D. in physics from Harvard University and a bachelor's degree in physics, mathematics, and statistical science from Cornell University.

 

DR. TROY VAN VOORHIS

Dr. Troy Van Voorhis - professor of chemistry at MIT and an expert in electron transfer dynamics, solar energy, and molecular electronics. Dr. Van Voorhis received his bachelor's degree in chemistry and mathematics from Rice University and his PhD in chemistry from the University of California at Berkeley. Following a postdoctoral fellowship at Harvard, he joined the faculty of MIT. His research focuses on the intersection of quantum mechanics and chemistry. In particular, his work addresses questions of how solar energy can be efficiently captured and stored.